How You Respond

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This page is focused on action-oriented resources. Please submit additional ideas here. The Resources page has reports and other informational resources about climate change.   

Taking Action As An Individual

By working together to identify solutions and bring about positive change, individuals and communities can reduce the risks that current and future generations face. The following resources can help you have informed and productive conversations about climate change and identify other steps you can take.

The AAAS Communication Toolkit provides guidance for scientists to build skills to more effectively communicate and engage with public audiences. Sections focus on various channels or modes of communication, including online and face-to-face communication and engaging with media.

The American Geophysical Union (a scientific society) has gathered resources from a variety of scientific societies, government agencies, and other organizations that people may find useful in having conversations about climate change with friends, neighbors, colleagues, and family members.

The nonprofit Climate Communication has written a series of articles on strategies to reduce or avoid the most severe consequences of climate change. This article provides suggestions for individuals and families interested in reducing their emissions; other articles in the series address actions that businesses, cities and nations might consider.

The George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication develops and applies social science insights to help society make informed decisions that will stabilize the earth’s life-sustaining climate, and prevent further harm from climate change.

This archived page from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency describes steps individuals can take at home, school, the office, and on the road to protect the climate, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and save money.

Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe’s lecture at the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting and editorial address the importance of connecting climate change with shared values and providing practical solutions that people can get excited about.

The Yale Program on Climate Change conducts scientific research on public climate change knowledge, attitudes, policy preferences, and behavior at global, national, and local scales.

From atmospheric scientist Scott Denning, this website offers resources for talking about climate change as simple, serious, and solvable.

Tonna-Marie Surgeon-Rogers, Project Lead for the Bringing Wetlands to Market (BWM) initiative.
Shannon Kenyon, an Assistant Groundwater Manager who has played a key role in helping farmers in Kansas reduce the amount of water they use for irrigation. Credit: Impact Media Lab / AAAS

Taking Action As a Community

There are many excellent resources for communities to take action on climate change: this is a small sample.

Educational Resources

There are many excellent resources for communities to take action on climate change: this is a small sample.

The Young Voices for the Planet film series features children and youth who are engaging their communities in conversations about solutions to climate change. Their civic engagement curriculum includes ways to use examples from the films in your own communities.

The nonprofit National Center for Science Education helps train teachers and community volunteers in approaches that have been proven to reduce conflict and help learners overcome misconceptions about evolution and climate change.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hosts resources from the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), which provides scientifically and pedagogically revieweddigital resources for teaching about climate’s influence on individuals and society and human influences on climate.

ISeeChange ambassador Yasmin Davis gets some help from students and teachers to install a rain gauge at a community center in New Orleans, Louisiana. Credit: Impact Media Lab / AAAS

Guides and Toolkits for Action

The American Planning Association (a professional society) has gathered resources related to best practices for planning for climate change.

Prepared by the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, this report discusses the need for trust, inclusion, cross-cultural communication, and supporting local practices and successes to order to increase community-specific preparedness.

Online database and networking site that serves policymakers and others who are working to help communities adapt to climate change.

EcoAmerica supports a network of faith, health, community, higher education, and business institutions interested in climate leadership. Their Moving Forward guide is geared toward civic leaders who want to lead on climate and sustainability and seek the resources to act.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Environmental and Climate Justice Program’s toolkit equips communities with information needed to implement projects on topics including local food systems, emergency management, stormwater infrastructure, housing, coastal resilience, and more.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology has collected resources focused on assisting communities and stakeholders on issues related to physical infrastructure and disaster resilience, preparing for hazards, and adapting to changing conditions.

Provides the analytical framework and methodology to help Navy Master Development Planners understand how to consider climate change in their plans and projects.

This guide is designed to help communities evaluate proposed projects, infrastructure and otherwise, while acknowledging the community characteristics that need to be taken into account in evaluating options. The guide was produced by Sustainable Adaptive Gradients in the Coastal Environment: SAGE, a National Science Foundation-funded research coordination network.

This handbook for cities from the nonprofit Rocky Mountain Institute is organized around 22 recommendations for no-regrets actions that will help cities become carbon free.

The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a website designed to help people find and use tools, information, and subject matter expertise to build climate resilience. The Toolkit offers information from all across the U.S. federal government in one location.

List of programs providing technical assistance to communities on smart growth approaches.

Highlights evidence and solutions for communities on the frontlines of responding to health and climate change.

NOAA web mapping tool to visualize community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise.

U.S. Department of Energy program that provides no-cost technical assistance to help communities install solar power.

Founder of ISeeChange, Julia Kumari Drapkin, shows children a map of historic New Orleans. Drapkin highlights the parts of the city that used to be swamp. Credit: Impact Media Lab / AAAS

Networks

The American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) is a professional society for people who are preparing for climate impacts in their jobs, in their communities, and in their fields of practice.

The Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO) is a professional development organization and cross-sector community of practice for individuals addressing climate change in their organizations’ operations and mission.

Climate Matters is a climate reporting resource program that helps meteorologists and journalists report on climate impacts and solutions in ways that are local, immediate, and personal — grounded in the latest science.

The National League of Cities Leadership in Community Resilience program provides grants and technical assistance, staff support, and professional development to community leaders.

Online, professionally facilitated connections between communities and national experts.

The Rising Voices program facilitates intercultural approaches for understanding and adapting to extreme weather and climate change. It brings together Indigenous and other scientific professionals, tribal and community leaders, environmental and communication experts, artists and others to assess critical community needs and pursue joint research.

American Geophysical Union’s Thriving Earth Exchange supports community science, i.e. the use of science to advance local and regional priorities. The platform includes tools, resources, and opportunities that help projects with everything from collaborative idea formulation to implementing a co-designed solution.

The Urban Sustainability Directors Network (USDN) is a network of local government professionals from communities across the United States and Canada dedicated to creating a healthier environment, economic prosperity, and increased social equity.

U.S. Climate Alliance states are committed to taking real, on the ground action that urgently addresses the climate challenge.

Collaboration of Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states and the District of Columbia working to reduce pollution from transportation and invest in a modern, clean transportation future.

Biochar (black substance) getting mixed into a salt supplement (white substance) for a herd of cattle.

Taking Action Nationally and Globally

This is another small sample of the resources available for acting on climate change at the national policymaker level and beyond.

A set of recommended practices for those who wish to communicate with policymakers about highly technical topics, developed by a research team from American University, AAAS, and University of New South Wales. The guide is based on a literature review, in-person interviews with Members of Congress and staff, a survey of hundreds of science communicators, and an analysis of expert testimony in Congress.

A comprehensive guide for interacting with members of Congress and their staff, from AAAS’s Office of Government Relations.

Science Rising is a network of partners and advocates for science, equity, and justice. It is a broad-based effort collectively organized by many different participating organizations and individuals.

Project Drawdown reviews, analyses, and identifies global climate solutions.